Beginning a Freelance Career with People Per Hour

Update – I now use freelancer.co.uk for all my hiring and freelancer work needs.

Before getting started on People Per Hour I really didn’t have any idea about how to get started as a freelance writer and with little knowledge of how to find jobs and clients it would have been easy to give up and remain as confused as ever.

When I found out about websites that were set up as an online portal where freelancers could meet buyers and complete jobs, it seemed too good to be true. I’ll admit, at first I was dubious. With so many websites available such as Odesk, Freelancer, People Per Hour and Elance I really had no idea where to start. I decided to get stuck in on People Per Hour as it was mainly UK freelancers and buyers and there seemed to be a lot of opportunities for writers like myself.

People Per Hour First Impressions

When I first got started on People Per Hour, it was not long before I was contemplating giving up. The freelance world is tough to break into, especially when there are so many other writers with more experience and reviews competing for the same jobs; I mean, who would pick a newbie with no feedback over a seasoned pro that can guarantee perfect work? Securing my first few jobs was not easy, but with some persistence I was able to complete some projects, get some feedback and build my profile.

There are a number of pros to using People Per Hour and it is relatively straightforward. Freelancers have the option of uploading Hourlies, one-off jobs that buyers can buy, or bidding on projects buyers need help with. All payments are made via People Per Hour and payment is held by the website whilst work is being completed; this means that freelancers can be sure they will receive payment, and buyers know they don’t have to release the funds if the work is to a poor standard. People Per Hour is very good at ensuring all work is conducted and is fair to both parties.

Building a Client Base on People Per Hour

After a while I started taking on bigger projects and by hourlies were being bought at a steady pace. I was able to get stuck in with on-going projects and those that are quite interesting. Some on-off clients turned into weekly or monthly buyers and happy clients started returning for more.

I have found the review and feedback section on a People Per Hour profile to be a great way to attract more clients; plus, their CERT system comes in handy too. As you complete more jobs on People Per Hour you increase your CERT score, another way for others to see how well you are doing and whether or not you are a professional with the required skills for their job.

As time progresses I have started branching out from People Per Hour and into interacting directly with new clients. Though the majority of work is still conducted via People Per Hour, on a few occasions my details have been passed on to other companies who want help with content writing and blogging. So even though it is early days, People Per Hour has led onto me building a freelance client base outside of the website.

You can check out our People Per Hour review here.

Are There Downsides?

I firmly believe that beginning a freelance career with People Per Hour is one of the best ways to start, unless you are fortunate enough to be handed a list of clients and are able to do so off of your own back. I read a number of reviews before beginning People Per Hour of bad service, freelancers not being paid but I – touch wood – am yet to have any negative experiences. On the odd occasion when a client refuses to pay despite the work being completed, I have always found People Per Hour quick to step in and ensure the dispute is settled fairly and with the appropriate payment.

The only downside I have found to freelancing on People Per Hour is their fee. Though it is understandable that as a company they need to make money, it is annoying as a freelancer when a percentage of all money earned goes to them. But, I have found it a small price to pay for an online world that has allowed me to earn a little extra away from my full-time job and build my client base, experience, and skill set as a writer.

For those thinking of beginning a career on People Per Hour, I would say go for it. You have nothing to lose. Everything on People Per Hour is an added extra and whether you are attempting to freelance as a way to earn a little extra pocket money or as a career change, it is a great way to start. Whether or not I can make a full-time career out of freelancing on People Per Hour is yet to be seen and I am unsure as to whether there is enough work to earn enough equal to a full-time wage, I suspect that a beginning a career with People Per Hour is ideal, but for long-term earnings freelancing elsewhere may be necessary.